• Subcribe to Our RSS Feed

Thank you Operation Stand Together!

Thank you Operation Stand Together!

Thank you to everyone who turned out for Operation Stand Together on May 20, 2017. Vince Diem, you deserve to be applauded for pulling the event off! It was a great venue and it gave us all a chance to meet the people we have worked with and worked for. Special thanks to Erin Brokovich, Commander Wells, and David Carpenter. Your willingness to help keeps us going strong. Thanks, also, to CNN who sent a crew out to cover the event.

Read more »

Fort McClellan Contamination

Fort McClellan Contamination

Currently, veterans who were trained or stationed at Fort McClellan, Alabama, are experiencing health problems that may be caused by substances that were routinely used for live agent chemical training and grounds maintenance. In addition, the Monsanto PCB plant located in the vicinity of Fort McClellan contributed to their health problems. This is the same plant that earned Anniston, Alabama its reputation as the most Toxic Town in America. There are no screening methods offered through the Veteran’s Administration system that will identify and treat our illnesses. Fort McClellan veterans are suffering from a wide variety of diseases ranging from cancer, to ALS, endocrine disorders, autoimmune disease, parathyroid tumors, chronic headaches, chronic pain, rashes, neurological problems, diabetes, and illnesses of “unknown origin” and some have died, without knowing the truth. The VA has included a webpage for Fort McClellan veterans on their Public Health site but it only acknowledges a slight chance of contamination. Veterans who served are just learning of the coverups and inadequate site investigations that continue to plague the BRAC close out that was started in 1999 and will continue for decades.

Read more »

Pentagon's budget concerns overshadow veterans' needs

Pentagon's budget concerns overshadow veterans' needs

Top Obama appointee says cost to notify soldiers of possible exposure to toxins too high By Alex Swoyer - The Washington Times - Sunday, January 11, 2015 Putting budget concerns ahead of troop welfare, a top Obama administration appointee declared to Congress that the Pentagon doesn’t want to spend the money to alert hundreds of thousands of soldiers who served at a once-contaminated Army base that they may have been exposed to toxins. “The cost of attempting to identify all these individuals, including the cost of media advertising, would be a significant burden on the Army’s budget and at a time when the Army is furloughing personnel due to a shortage of funds,” Elizabeth King, the Pentagon’s top liaison to Congress, wrote in an internal email to a House staffer in 2013. The email, obtained and authenticated by The Washington Times, was written in response to unsuccessful efforts by Rep. Paul Tonko, New York Democrat, to get legislation passed in the last Congress that would require notification to veterans who were stationed at Fort McClellan, inAnniston, Alabama, before it was closed for widespread contamination 15 years ago.

Read more »

Feel free to contact us at info@poisonedveterans.org or send us a message below.